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Dairy Arts Center

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Sing Our Rivers Red

SING OUR RIVERS RED Open to the public May – Oct., 2021 The SORR exhibit will take place in the McMahon Gallery at the Dairy Arts Center. Free and open to the public Monday-Saturday 2pm-6pm.    Featuring works by Chad Yellowjohn, Nathalie Standingcloud, Mary Jane Oatman, Crystal Dugi, Lakota Sage, Olivia Montoya, and JayCee Beyale,

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Art for Redemption

ART FOR REDEMPTION Open June – July 2021 You will find these works on display outside the Dairy Arts Center building. Over the next two months, we will be showcasing a series of incarcerated artists in collaboration with Art For Redemption on the front walkway wall of The Dairy Arts Center. AFR is a Social

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Juneteenth Artist Spotlight: Moe Gram

Moe Gramm | Denver Colorado  GIVE A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE WORK YOU DO: I am an interdisciplinary visual artist most commonly known for my large scale mixed media collage and mural paintings. WHAT DO YOU WISH MORE PEOPLE KNEW ABOUT JUNETEENTH? WHAT DOES JUNETEENTH MEAN TO YOU?  – The freedom of enslaved black people

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Juneteenth Artist Spotlight: Jahna Rae Church

Jahna Rae Church | Denver, CO GIVE A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF THE WORK YOU DO: Most of my work is a combination of ink and various types of paint, and recently got into painting murals. I’ve always been interested in the sacred feminine and feminism in modern society, so a lot of what I create includes

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SING OUR RIVERS RED

Opens to the public May 12, 2021

The SORR exhibit will take place in the McMahon Gallery at the Dairy Arts Center. Please sign up below to visit the exhibit Monday - Saturday starting at 2 PM. Limited capacity groups will be given up to 1 hour to visit the galleries to maintain safety and help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Click the ticket icon to make your reservation today!Monday

Featuring works by Chad Yellowjohn, Nathalie Standingcloud, Mary Jane Oatman, Crystal Dugi, Lakota Sage, Olivia Montoya, and JayCee Beyale, Sarah Ortegon, Danielle SeeWalker, Donna Chrisjohn, Jonathan Nelson, Gregg Deal

Sing Our Rivers Red (#SORR) aims to bring awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and colonial gender-based violence in the United States and Canada.

This exhibition strives to raise consciousness, unite ideas, and demand action for our Indigenous women, girls, and two-spirt relatives who have been taken, tortured, raped, trafficked, assaulted, and murdered. We demand proper attention and justice for our relatives.

The exhibition is centered around over 5,000 single earrings, separated from a pair. Each earring represents a current Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) case in North America. The earrings have been collected from all around Turtle Island and beyond since 2015, many from people that have been directly affected by MMIWG. The idea behind collecting a one-sided pair of earrings is to symbolize how we continue holding onto something we cherish even if part of it is missing. It is about the process of reconciliation with the loss of the other side, or in other words, the loss of a loved one.

The abuse of women is well known in history and tells you a lot about what is hapening to our earth. #MMIP #MMIR #MMIW #MMIWG #MMIWG2S

LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Tweet

Complementing the earring installation are letters from people that have been affected by this epidemic and works of art from regionally based artists that personally advocate and bring awareness to MMIW.

Ribbon skirts hanging in the center of the gallery honor the many Indigenous women here in Colorado that have been murdered. Ribbon skirts are a historical and traditional clothing adopted in the late 18th century as traders began to offer Native people wool, cotton and ribbons to use for clothing. There are numerous beliefs and reasons as to why Indigenous women wear the ribbon skirt but overall, they tie Native American women to the earth, to ceremonies and to the political unrest of issues including the injustice of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and two-spirits. They are considered an expression of history, resilience, and character. These skirts have been handmade by local Denver-based artists and are for sale as well as other pieces throughout the exhibition.

 #MMIP #MMIR #MMIW #MMIWG #MMIWG2S

Sing Our Rivers Red
A Creative Nations Exhibition.
Sing Our Rivers Red
A Creative Nations Exhibition.
Sing Our Rivers Red
A Creative Nations Exhibition.
Sing Our Rivers Red
A Creative Nations Exhibition.
Sing Our Rivers Red
A Creative Nations Exhibition.
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About the Exhibits

Sing Our Rivers Red Earring Exhibit

The Sing Our Rivers Red earring exhibit travels to raise awareness about murdered and missing Indigenous women and colonial gender-based violence in the United States and Canada. Sing Our Rivers Red events aim to bring awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and colonial gender-based violence in the United States and Canada. The events strive to raise consciousness, unite ideas, and demand action for Indigenous women, girls, Two-Spirit, and LGBTQQIA people who have been murdered or gone missing, tortured, raped, trafficked, and assaulted, who have not had the proper attention or justice. SORR also is being planned in solidarity and with a collaborative spirit, meant to support the efforts built in Canada, as well as highlight the need for awareness and action to address colonial gender violence in the United States. The SORR exhibit will take place in the McMahon Gallery at the Dairy Arts Center.

MMIWG+ Art Exhibit

Various works of art promoting MMIWG+ awareness by Native artists of different nations on display at the Dairy Arts Center. Not only do these artists raise awareness for the MMIWG+ issue with their works, but they’re also continually taking action and contributing causes combatting this epidemic firsthand. Featured artists are Chad Yellowjohn, Nathalie Standingcloud, Mary Jane Oatman, Crystal Dugi, Lakota Sage and Olivia Montoya.

Native Fashion Taking Action Exhibit featuring Patricia Michaels

See the works of world-renowned Native American fashion designer and ‘Project Runway’ alum Patricia Michaels who is taking action against the Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls epidemic with her works of art and fashion. Displayed in a unique, dynamic exhibit, Patricia’s collection is cutting-edge–not only do the couture pieces showcase Patricia’s creativity and innovation, they were especially created to bring attention to the MMIWG+ epidemic plaguing Native communities. As a survivor and leader in raising awareness and taking action against MMIWG+, Patricia is happy and excited to partake in this first-of-its-kind fashion exhibit. The Native Fashion Taking Action exhibit will take place in the center of the Dairy Arts Center, with a special video promoting the collection playing on the McMahon Gallery.

Mural by Creative Nations' artist JayCee Beyale

Accomplished Diné artist JayCee Beyale will debut a mural exhibition that will be on display at the Dairy Arts Center, which is inspired by the MMIWG Movement. JayCee’s mural will be on display at the Polly Addison Gallery at the Dairy Arts Center.

ART FOR REDEMPTION​

Open June - July 2021

You will find these works on display outside the Dairy Arts Center building.

About the Exhibition

Over the next two months, we will be showcasing a series of incarcerated artists in collaboration with Art For Redemption on the front walkway wall of The Dairy Arts Center. AFR is a Social Impact Company focusing on prison reform to allow inmates to make money through their creative talent.

The idea for AFR came from Buck Adams’ time in prison and participating in Defy Colorado, an in-prison entrepreneur program. Seeing first-hand the tremendous creativity and talent that was “locked up” with no way to be shared with the outside. Once released, Buck developed the idea into action with the support of friends, family, community, and investors.

After release, Buck worked closely with Defy Colorado and Colorado Department of Corrections, Ex. Director Dean Williams to amend rules with regard to inmates’ ability to earn money while in prison. Buck believes inmates should be able to generate funds while in prison to help build a savings account that can be used to help with their transition once released. The recidivism rate averages over 80% nationwide and Colorado sits around 70%. A big reason for this is most do not have any kind of monetary savings or support networks in place. Having just a small amount saved up could go a long way in helping get clothes and temporary shelter while looking for work as they transition back into society.

The successful negotiation with the Colorado DOC now allows an outside vendor to develop an approved structured vehicle to help incarcerated individuals pay restitution, child support as well as funds for phone calls and commissary. This creates the ability for the incarcerated individual to relieve a tremendous burden placed on family and loved ones, as well as taxpayers. Many people lose touch with loved ones in this dynamic simply because the financial burden is too great.

By sharing the creativity and stories of incarcerated men and women, we hope to bring attention to this cause and bridge the gap of humanity through art.

About Art for Redemption's Founder

Founded by Buck Adams, a veteran, social entrepreneur, and formerly incarcerated individual at the Arkansas Valley Correction Facility, Art for Redemption harnesses the talent, creativity, and human ingenuity of those inside the prison walls. While at Arkansas Valley Correctional Facility, Adams began working with Defy Colorado, an independent nonprofit organization helping individuals with criminal histories create legal business ventures to bring his idea to life. Prior to incarceration, Adams founded and led Veterans to Farmers, a nonprofit organization that trains veterans in agricultural systems, technologies, and business operations for a fulfilling and sustainable lifestyle.

Meet the Artists

Three artists will be featured in June and four will be added in July.

Joaquin Mares – #81193

Piece title and medium used
“On Point” medium is acrylic on canvas.
Is there a way for folks to inquire about the artist’s work?
You can write me or email me:
Joaquin Mares
#81193 Unit 6A
49030 State Highway 71
Limon, CO 80826
How long have you (the artist) been creating art?
What is your art background? I lived most of my 49 years of life creating art. However, I’ve only been serious about it for about 20 years. I am mostly self taught.
How has the “Art for Redemption” program influenced your life? Your art?
As an incarcerated artist I want to utilize my art to help change the conversation about incarcerated people by providing a platform alongside Art for Redemption.
How do you stay motivated to create art? What are your influences?
My Art was used as a way to escape, but then I realized that I could empower myself through Art. To embrace my reality and use it as a motivation to change it. Adversity can be a powerful motivator. Therefore, I am ultimately motivated by the adversity of my situation and the desire to change it. Artistically speaking, I am mostly influenced by rule-breakers. The rare individuals who change the game by refusing the limitations of conventional thought.
How do you want your art to be received by audiences that are not incarcerated?
I would like people to not just view my art, but to experience it. Personally, I feel that people should walk away from a piece of art feeling moved in some way similar to how we experience music.
What other things would you want people to know about you and your art?
Although my creative journey originated in the visual arts realm, my love for art knows no boundaries. Music is another form of art I have grown deeply passionate about over the years. I hope to someday have the opportunity to share that part of me publicly as well.


Westley James Ybarra – “West” – #134751 



Piece title and medium used

Untitled, Graphite/color pencil
Is there a way for folks to inquire about the artist’s work? (i.e. website/social media/contact info)
Instagram “westleyybarra”
How long have you (the artist) been creating art? What is your art background?
I’ve been creating Art since I was around 10 years old and have failed every art class I have ever taken
How has the “Art for Redemption” program influenced your life? Your art?
Art is my escape + my therapy
How do you stay motivated to create art? What are your influences?
Being in prison you become all too aware of the lows and negativities, but when I see or create art, I am reminded and restored in my faith for humanity.
How do you want your art to be received by audiences that are not incarcerated?
To be received with openness while demonstrating that everyone makes mistakes and that those mistakes do not define who you are. Art is what makes us human and it transcends all barriers of class or social status.
What other things would you want people to know about you and your art?
What other things would I like others to know? That while my body is physically trapped and cannot move at will, my art is free to roam far and wide. I want for others to see me and other inmates as more than just another invisible statistical faceless prisoner.


Mario Rios – # 92442



Piece title and medium used

“Noche de los Muertos” ( Night of the Dead)
Is there a way for folks to inquire about the artist’s work? (i.e. website/social media/contact info)
People can write me directly at:
Mario Rios #92442
AVCF – LU – 3
12750 Hwy 96 Ln 13
Ordway, CO 81034
How long have you (the artist) been creating art? What is your art background?
Ever since I could pick up a crayon, so about the age of 2. I am very adept in many forms of media such as graphite pencil, color pencil, marker, paint, cake decorating, pumpkin carving, and woodwork.
How has the “Art for Redemption” program influenced your life? Your art?
I have found a way to make others happy through my Art while being able to support a friend like Buck to be successful with his company.
How do you stay motivated to create art? What are your influences?
Art has always been an outlet for expressing myself in a creative manner and it has helped me personally with my mental health.
I have many influences, but one particular artistic influence is Boris Vallejo.
How do you want your art to be received by audiences that are not incarcerated?
I would like people to understand that what the world experienced with the pandemic and having to be locked down is just a fraction of what an incarcerated artist deals with every day and yet, we use our imagination to escape that reality.
What other things would you want people to know about you and your art?
Just as we can grow as artists by working on our craft, we can also grow to be better people by rectifying our past actions.

Jeremy Bowles – California – #AP6627



Piece title and medium used

Knowledge – Oil Painting 
Is there a way for folks to inquire about the artist’s work? (i.e. website/social media/contact info)
Please contact my wife Dinah Bowles – dinahnjeremybowles@gmail.com
How long have you (the artist) been creating art? What is your art background?
I started drawing around 8 years old and have been an Artist ever since. I transitioned to graffiti art during my teenage years and have recently moved toward Realism with my paintings and murals.
How has the “Art for Redemption” program influenced your life? Your art?
To introduce my artwork into the public mainstream and get it out from behind prison walls. My hope is to give back to the community one day through my Art.
How do you stay motivated to create art? What are your influences?
I find motivation and satisfaction when I see viewers of my work respond with expressive excitement and joy. There are too many influences to name because I draw inspiration from Art around the world and various Art History books. I have seen so many amazing Artists behind bars and on the streets. One huge particular Artist that has influenced me since I was a young boy is my grandmother. I can remember watching in amazement as she doodled images that looked so realistic that they would fly off the paper.
How do you want your art to be received by audiences that are not incarcerated?
Personally, I feel astonishing Art comes from dark places. I feel an Artist can shine a light on their personal perspective by allowing viewers to see through their eyes by widening our lens to see what some cannot. We are given a chance to live vicariously through their creativity.
What other things would you want people to know about you and your art?
I live every day with a positive mindset. I will continue to create even when my hands don’t work and my eyes don’t focus. My life will push forward in other ways to respect the discipline of Art. Continuing forward with self-love will inspire and generate meaningful pieces of Art.

Danny Reyna – #2114499

Piece title
“Homembound
Is there a way for folks to inquire about the artist’s work?
Social media & Instagram: @D.Swang214
Contact: via JPAY 
Danny Reyna #2114499 or
Beto Unit
1391 FM 3328
Palestine, TX 75880
How long have you (the artist) been creating art?
I am a self-taught artist that has been creating art for the past 3 years. I would describe myself as a newfound artist. Since my incarceration, I’ve learned new artistic skills that I never knew I possessed. Art, to me, has been the most therapeutic way to express my emotions, thoughts, and opinions. The different mediums available to me at the moment are pencil, watercolor, and tattooing. I am constantly improving and applying myself to increase my skill set. Drawing is fun and challenging at the same time. I can get heavily involved into the project and before I realize it, I’ve productively passed my time. I give thanks to the Lord for giving me this skill set, passion, strength, and hope. Much love!
How has the “Art for Redemption” program influenced your life? Your art?
In the Art for Redemption opportunity I found a way to occupy my time productively and to challenge myself.
How do you stay motivated to create art? What are your influences?
My motivation to create art comes from self-improvement, self-expression, and sending art to my loved ones. Other artists, especially tattoo artists, have shown me techniques throughout the years of incarceration.
How do you want your art to be received by audiences that are not incarcerated?
I would like the audience to experience the beauty created by our minds and soul. No matter how bad our environments were during Covid in prison, the human spirit perseveres. 
What other things would you want people to know about you and your art?
I began drawing as a means to escape my reality. Only to discover that I didn’t need to escape. I need to embrace it and change my perspective on the entire situation. Namaste and God Bless!

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MARCH 2020

As of today, 3/12/2020, The Dairy Arts Center remains open and operational. Should scheduling changes occur, ticket holders will be directly notified by The Dairy Arts Center.

If you have a question about an event please contact the presenting arts organization. For films, Dairy Presents and all other questions contact the Box Office at 303.440.7826